Dr. YVONNE WILLIAMS
PhD, MSc, BSc, BACP (ACCRED)

EMPOWERMENT
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and recovery

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BIPOC: NAVIGATING OUR BODIES SAFELY IN WHITE SPACES

Facilitated by Dr Yvonne Williams

2 HOUR SESSIONS FOR 6 WEEKS AND ONLY 10 ATTENDEES PER SESSION
2nd Sept, 9th Sept, 16th Sept, 23rd Sept, 30th Sept, 7th Oct 2021
Time: 6.00pm - 8.00pm

Fee: Total of 6 sessions
Professionals £300
Student £200
Hosted on zoom

“The body is where we live. From the body’s viewpoint, safety and danger are neither situational nor based on cognitive feelings.Rather, they are physical, visceral sensations.The body either has a sense of safety or it doesn’t.If it doesn’t, it will do almost anything to establish or recover that sense of safety” (R. Menakem, 2017)

Last year, many of us witnessed through the media, the brutal killing of George Floyd by a police officer. The killing evoked a massive outcry within Black communities across the United States. We then saw many anti-racism protests organised by Black Lives Matter in the USA and across Europe. On April 21st2021, Derek Chauvin, the police officer charged with the death of George Floyd murder was found guilty. Although justice had been served, it was brought to my attention that, many black people and people of colour experienced distress and many felt retraumatised. Watching reoccurring imagery of what happened to George Floyd may have evoked past racial traumas that resulted in the re-experiencing of past traumatic event(s). As James Baldwin stated, “History is not the past, it is the present. We carry our history with us. We are our history” and thus as BIPOC it is important for us to know how to safely navigate our bodies in whites spaces.

The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities concluded, in their recent report that, Britain no longer has a systemic issue with racial discrimination. Ironically, at the time of the report’s publication, the media reported inherent racism behind Pimlico Academy’s polices. BIPOC students were subjected to discrimination through the school’s uniform policy that demonised black hairstyles and religious clothing. Systemic racism is not only embedded in education, it cuts across the criminal justice system, employment, housing, healthcare and the government. More often, racism is disguised in covert forms such as unconscious biases, microaggressions, racial coded language and racial gaslighting.

Course Overview

This course is targeted at people from the BIPOC communities who have experienced emotional injury due to racism, discrimination, micro-aggression, or racial gaslighting etc. in white dominated places. After researching into the psychological impact of systemic racisms, I have been sharing my knowledge and research with clients who have come to counselling or attended workshops who have expressed difficulties navigating themselves in white dominated workplaces. For this reason, I devised this six-week course which will provide an awareness and understanding of the psychological impact of living with systemic racism, providing coping strategies and techniques useful for safeguarding our bodies from further psychological distress.

The course will address:
  • Race based trauma: identifying and treatment
  • Post traumatic Slavery Syndrome: identifying intergenerational trauma and the impact living in a white supremacy culture.
  • Lived experiences of racism: lived space (lived spatiality), Lived body, (corporeality), lived time (temporality) and lived other (relationality)
  • How to safeguard our bodies in white spaces
  • How to regain power and control in situations where we feel powerless and lack control
  • How to address racial equity in the workspace.

Attendees will

  • share experiences of racism, discrimination, microaggressions, racial gaslighting etc. and reflect on how it impacts our body and mind.
  • identify barriers that prevent open and honest dialogues about racism and discrimination within the workplace.
  • create strategies to manage emotional injury and safeguarding our bodies.
  • begin laying the groundwork for racial equity practices.

How to register: Send an email to healingartistry@yvonnewilliamspsychotherapy.co.uk or complete the form found in the “Contact Us” section of our website.
Please note: There are a maximum of 10 Places per session, so don’t delay your booking.
Booking conditions: We regret that refund cannot be given unless we are notified in writing 14 days prior to the event, 50% of the fee will be refunded if this requirement is met.

Healing Artistry is an innovative and holistic organisation which places great importance on the mind, body and soul of all individuals. Our holistic approach is dedicated to taking individuals on a path of self-discovery for personal, professional growth and recovery. Our services are aimed to provide a transformative process in which people’s physical, emotional, cognitive, spiritual and social wellbeing is improved through counselling/psychotherapy, storytelling and other creative platforms.

Every day, BIPOC are having to confront forms of racism fuelled by ideologies of white supremacy which inevitably impacts the body causing psychological distress. While it is difficult to dismantle structural racism, as an organisation, in our day-to-day interactions, programmes and operations we promote equity and endeavour to intercept intentional and conscious/unconscious inequality patterns and behaviours.

Dr Williams received her PhD from University of Leeds. Her PhD research analyses the impact of systemic racism on mental health using the qualitative method called Heuristic Hermeneutics Phenomenological Inquiry and design that redress power and control in order to empower, rebuild confidence, self-esteem and self-worth in black people.

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